Did Kelly Clarkson Change Billie Eilish Song Lyrics as a Dig at Her Ex-Husband?

Jill O'Rourke
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Kelly Clarkson is the queen of covers with her series Kellyoke, and she always puts so much emotion into what she sings. It often seems like Clarkson is relating the song to her own life, and recently she even went as far as to change the lyrics.


The Voice coach covered “Happier Than Ever” by Billie Eilish for the Kellyoke segment on her talk show, and her twist on the track has people wondering if she’s taking a dig at her ex-husband Brandon Blackstock.

Kelly Clarkson Changes Song Lyrics in Possible Dig at Brandon Blackstock

In “Happier Than Ever,” Eilish originally sings, “I don’t relate to you / I don’t relate to you, no / ‘Cause I’d never treat me this shitty / You make me hate this city.” It’s easy to miss the slight change Clarkson made to this part of the song if you’re not paying close attention.

“I get it, you hate this city,” Clarkson sings in her version of the track. Notably, the singer also kept the curse words in her performance, opting for them to be bleeped rather than changing them or skipping over them.


So what’s the meaning behind Clarkson’s lyric change? One internet theory is that she’s calling out Blackstock for their legal battle over a ranch on Montana. While Clarkson has been in Los Angeles, Blackstock has been working on the ranch. However, a judge recently ruled that the Montana property belongs to Clarkson.

SEE ALSO: BLAKE SHELTON CHOOSES FRIENDSHIP WITH KELLY CLARKSON OVER HER EX BRANDON BLACSTOCK

Clarkson Wants Blackstock Off Montana Ranch

Rather than continuing his work as a talent manager, Blackstock reportedly testified that he wanted to work full-time on the ranch. However, according to the terms of Clarkson’s prenup, the ranch belongs to her, since she bought it with her own money.


Despite this, TMZ reports that Blackstock is refusing to leave the property. Clarkson is reportedly considering legal action to get him out, since she considers him a squatter. That would certainly explain the singer’s recent lyric change, as Blackstock is apparently adamant about staying in Montana rather than returning to L.A.

You can feel the emotion in Clarkson’s cover of “Happier Than Ever,” which is all about feeling better without someone. Considering a judge recently approved single status for Clarkson and Blackstock, the track feels even more relevant.

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